For Boomers And Seekers

"Religion in the United States is a brilliantly colored kaleidoscope ever taking on configurations of blended hues.”

WADE CLARK ROOF, PROFESSOR OF RELIGION AND SOCIETY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA

Spiritual Marketplace

That’s what Professor Roof calls his study of Boomer religions. It’s also the title of his book: Spiritual Marketplace, Baby Boomers and the Remaking of American Religion. (Wade Clark Roof, Princeton University Press, 2001, ISBN: 0-691-08996-5)

Roof references a “quest culture” created by the Baby Boomers — one growing out of “their yearning for a wholeness of body, mind, and spirit; the impact of the media; and globalization. Although some of these individuals have returned to churches and synagogues, most remain unaffiliated with religious institutions. A broad and eclectic group of suppliers has arisen to serve their needs and interests: self-help groups, retreat centers, spiritual seminars, New Age workshops, meditation cassettes and videos, and an unending stream of books about spirituality and the world’s religions.”

Indeed. Just visit a large chain bookstore and/or the internet. The once ‘booming’ (pun intended) “religion” section appears to be dwarfing as more “spiritual” topics emerge in popularity — angels, meditation, spiritual journey, prophecy, the sacred, esoterica (to name a few). This splintering of the religious perspective seems to indicate that our society has become more interested in spiritual concerns than in religion (there is a difference, you know). Or perhaps we’re just caught up in the latest trend (typical Baby Boomer, huh?).

If you are one of the “seekers” that Roof references — and if you’re especially looking for a sensible spirituality —you’ll likely be intrigued with some of the mind-bending theories presented in How Did God Do It?